Alex Washburn

They say death can come in many forms, but in Mexico she is a woman with many names: La Niña Blanca (the white girl), La Flaquita (the skinny girl), La Dama Poderosa (the powerful woman) and Santísima Muerte (most holy saint of death).


A decade ago 99 percent of Mexico had never heard of Santa Muerte.


Today, more than 5 million Mexican citizens — and many more worldwide — identify as worshipers of the skeleton saint. 


According to religious scholars the explosion in popularity started when a woman named Enriqueta Romero placed an altar to Santa Muerte outside her nondescript home in the rough Mexico City barrio of Morelos. 


I had the great pleasure of spending several hours with Enriqueta at her home. 



Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
Photos taken at the home of Enriqueta Romero in the Morelos neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico.
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